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Post-Human (Post-Human Trilogy, #2) por…
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Post-Human (Post-Human Trilogy, #2) (edição 2009)

por David Simpson

Séries: Post-Human (2)

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1174186,265 (3.63)1
The future should have been perfect. Microscopic robots known as nans could repair any damage to your body, keep you young by resetting your cellular clocks, and allow you to download upgrades like intelligence, muscle strength, and eyesight. You were supposed to be able to have anything you wanted with a simple thought, to be able to fly without the aid of a machine, to be able to live forever. But when a small group of five terraformers working on Venus return to Earth, they discover that every other human in the solar system has been gruesomely murdered. Now, James Keats and his four companions must discover what happened to the rest of humanity and fight back if they wish to avoid the same, horrifying fate. Welcome to the post-human era.… (mais)
Membro:elavram
Título:Post-Human (Post-Human Trilogy, #2)
Autores:David Simpson
Informação:Publisher Unknown (2009), Kindle Edition, 180 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

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Post-Human por David Simpson

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Little unsure about one thing, sometimes it had the feel of YA and sometimes not. But YA readers could definitely read this book, and especially boys.

This is the future and everyone is used to having everything served on a silver platter. They are all smart and getting smarter with each upgrade. They can fly (well not really but thanks to technology), wounds are healed, they live and live, and everything is just perfect.

But some resist, a group called the Purists, and they are us, we who live now that is. I got pretty irritated when the group came across purists and went all "gross, they eat things from the ground, and meat, and they operate on people to save them." I felt the post humans were pretty ungrateful, if people in the past hadn't invented things they would not be where they are now. So they annoyed me then. I wanted to shake the person and say, hey, your world is not perfect.

Cos that brings us to the story, a group is away on Venus terraforming and when they get back everyone is dead, yes everyone. Then they have to find who did it and they have to save themselves.

It had this futuristic matrix kind of feel to it. AI, robots and technology for everyone. I did wonder though, if everyone is so smart, then who has the more crappy jobs. I mean everyone on the planet has an IQ of 147 and wouldn't they all want good jobs? Their world seem to perfect but at the same time it was scary. It was too perfect, living forever, being smart, and I will not say what, but obviously it all went to hell.

A sci-fi thriller for those who enjoy these kind of books.

( )
  blodeuedd | Mar 2, 2016 |
Not quite what I was expecting, but a fun read. Lately, if I read a book about nanobots, there's lots of science, but this was a space opera. Very good, without some of the elements that ruin the pulp stories for me: woman are equals, no racism & such. It was quite a trip, a pulp SF story using newer technology. Lots of action & suspense. I'll be watching for other books by this author. ( )
  jimmaclachlan | Aug 18, 2014 |
A quick read because you can't stop turning the pages (or tapping the Kindle). I liked the scifi aspect but didn't much like the characters. Perhaps there wasn't enough time to get to know them & care deeply about them. I spent a lot of time wishing for Thel's demise & James irritated me as well. These two have a romance that renders them juveniles. All rational thought & the experience of their years falls to the wayside & it's not fun to watch. Possibly this is because we're just repeatedly told they're in love but never find out why, so all the desperation, even after an apocalypse, feels hollow & tedious. Additionally, for the majority of the book, there didn't seem to be any other reason for Thel to be, other than to tell James that she couldn't lose him & wouldn't live without him. Don't tarry, Thel. Go! Do! I did buy & enjoy the connection between Old-timer & Alejandra. I was torn on how that ended.

Also, it felt a bit false when everyone in the group, who all have IQs of 149 or so, completely defer all decision making after the catastrophe to James & asked the most banal questions of him. Seriously, none of them but James knew about the existence of maps & atlases? The library? The magnetic field of Mercury? I felt like they should have had more to contribute to the decisions but they really had nothing to offer. I don't care if James is the guy with the additional 50 IQ points, they know they're not imbeciles & are some of the best in their fields. I expected more of them. And James didn't have a perfect record of decision making, so he could have used the input. I suppose I wanted to feel that these people were smarter than me & I would spend a lot of time saying "Ah, yes. I see." when they divulged some prolific idea. Instead I rolled my eyes a lot & thought "Come on guys, break out those brain cells & dazzle me with your brilliance." They seemed to be able to get along well enough when James was incapacitated so why nothing before?

I liked everything with the Purists (though I couldn't understand why the group found the fact that they were meat eaters a problem when it's shown that the first meal James eats in the book is a bagel with a poached egg. Animal products as food, replicated or not, shouldn't be squickifying.). There were some genuine chuckle moments with the barbs both groups tossed at one another. I found Thel, Rich & Djanet really grated on my nerves when they were with the Purists. They were so put off by the Purists & thought themselves so superior I was yelling "But they didn't get their asses handed to them, save five, by the AI, did they?"

The author did excel at giving a sense of place & described the AI to chilling clarity. I very much enjoyed that. The description of the aftermath of the catastrophe was quite vivid & while I don't want to sound like a gory girl, I liked it. I very much enjoyed all the interaction with the AI. Well done. Poor Katherine, but so well done! Altogether, I gave this four stars because even though I had some problems with the main characters, I was compelled to keep reading because I wanted to know how it would resolve. I thought the resolution was a bit too safe & happy but there are worse things in the world. I would have liked deeper reflection from the core group we follow on the flaws inherent in their world, especially after having experienced the Purists.

I would definitely read the next installment because I think the story is one worth following (& there were elements that reminded me of Dune: The Butlerian Jihad & the short lived Caprica series. Joy.). ( )
  anissaannalise | Jan 1, 2014 |
Post-Human by David Simpson is a solid, engaging sci-fi novel. It’s not flashy or groundbreaking, but it has a nice subtle touch that blends the futuristic elements effortlessly with the more human aspects of the narrative.

Post-Human is set some time in the future, in the world of James Keats. Humans have shaped machines to their own ends, making great advancements, becoming themselves partly machine, with nanobots streaming through their bodies. Earth seems flawless, until a worldwide catastrophe terminates their idyllic existence. James and his friends must deal with the aftermath, and the shocking truth of what happened.

What I enjoyed most about this book was the matter-of-fact way the author handled the science aspects of the plot. There were no long-winded, technical explanations; he plunked you right in the middle of the society and whipped you along for the ride. It was artfully done, creating a complete science fiction backdrop for the novel’s authentic characters. The book also has some excellent character interactions and nicely written, restrained commentaries on tolerance, humanity and the nature of religion. The author lets these observations flow naturally from the plot and dialogue and does not thump the reader over the head with his opinions.

I was hoping for a slightly darker ending; things were wrapped up a bit too happily ever after for my tastes, but that is simply a personal quibble. Post-Human is a great sci-fi novel and a very satisfying read; I definitely recommend it. ( )
  scribe77 | Mar 25, 2010 |
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The future should have been perfect. Microscopic robots known as nans could repair any damage to your body, keep you young by resetting your cellular clocks, and allow you to download upgrades like intelligence, muscle strength, and eyesight. You were supposed to be able to have anything you wanted with a simple thought, to be able to fly without the aid of a machine, to be able to live forever. But when a small group of five terraformers working on Venus return to Earth, they discover that every other human in the solar system has been gruesomely murdered. Now, James Keats and his four companions must discover what happened to the rest of humanity and fight back if they wish to avoid the same, horrifying fate. Welcome to the post-human era.

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