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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the…
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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (edição 2012)

por Michelle Alexander (Autor), Cornel West (Introdução)

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3,7861102,485 (4.43)291
This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.… (mais)
Membro:timothygeorge
Título:The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Autores:Michelle Alexander (Autor)
Outros autores:Cornel West (Introdução)
Informação:The New Press (2012), 336 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness por Michelle Alexander (Author)

  1. 00
    Black And Catholic in the Jim Crow South: The Stuff That Makes Community por Danny Duncan Collum (fulner)
    fulner: Black and Catholic explorers the loves of those who loved through double discrimination. In 21st century America we have a hard time imaging Southern Baptists and Catholics being bitter enemies but in the Jim crow South Catholics were less trusted than negros, a black one even worse. The new Jim crow shows the legal separation of the mid 20th century still e exists but in a way now the white liberals don't care.… (mais)
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    Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot por Mikki Kendall (fannyprice)
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    Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond por Marc Lamont Hill (Othemts)
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    A Costly American Hatred por Joseph Rodney Dole (arethusarose)
    arethusarose: A broad look at the American penal system with an emphasis on Illinois. What is astonishing about this book is that the author is in prison in Illinois, spent years in a supermax prison, and yet managed to do substantial research and construct clear, cogent work on the US penal system. He is also brave to publish this work while still in prison.… (mais)
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    Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America por Jill Leovy (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Books deal with different, but related issues. Both are important.
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As I said before, California's 3-strike rule was in full force when I lived there in 2011-2012. So many of the people that I lived around did something for or depended on the people that worked in the jail system. Some of the best people I've known worked with the inmates and others had issues. I think that typifies my opinion of law enforcement officers in general. But the rule needs to go. It really does. They had 33 prisons at that time. 33! And some of them holding, for life!, people who were like the ones that she references in the book.

It was a riveting thesis and there were mounds of information that was generally well-cited (Yay Chicago-Turabian!).

There were several points where I wanted more specific citation information. For example, she would sometimes say something like "Dave Stevens of such-and-such organization said.... " and then the quote would follow, but there wouldn't be a direct link to that quote. And it's googleable, I get it. But that's my quirky, old-fashioned style. And, for the most part, the beautiful little numbers were plentifully available in the text.

At this point, with the legalization of recreational marijuana, it would behoove a large team of doctors to do a study on said effects. Marijuana, for the record, has been really hard to study because, up until the recent years, what you could do legally in a study was strongly controlled(I went to 6 conference sessions on the topic in mid-2018 and got the benefit of a professional lecture in mid-2019). And there were certain restraints in the past that have strongly influenced/limited potential results. See my rants on the medical system in the following books: [b:Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men|41104077|Invisible Women Data Bias in a World Designed for Men|Caroline Criado Perez|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1550931169l/41104077._SY75_.jpg|64218580], [b:Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer|469778|Overtreated Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer|Shannon Brownlee|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1431397952l/469778._SY75_.jpg|458090], [b:Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick|30653955|Doing Harm The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick|Maya Dusenbery|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1513491498l/30653955._SX50_.jpg|51198903][b:Critical Decisions: How You and Your Doctor Can Make the Right Medical Choices Together|15829238|Critical Decisions How You and Your Doctor Can Make the Right Medical Choices Together|Peter A. Ubel|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1345014923l/15829238._SY75_.jpg|21563172], [b:Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health|8343437|Overdiagnosed Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health|H. Gilbert Welch|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1320478703l/8343437._SY75_.jpg|13194525], and [b:Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won't Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care|13538861|Unaccountable What Hospitals Won't Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care|Marty Makary|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1344317040l/13538861._SY75_.jpg|19101212].

So, if you were hoping that this was going to make me want to legalize drugs, it didn't. I think we need more information on that. But it does make me want to revamp the legal patterns as well as the police system(anyone know why and when police moved from having a "beat" to the current system?). It also makes me want to crack down on white users and distributors.

If you disagree, and you're welcome to, I recommend reading the following (none of which are perfect) and then let's talk:

[b:Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead|13588356|Daring Greatly How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead|Brené Brown|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1337110319l/13588356._SY75_.jpg|19175758]
[b:12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos|30257963|12 Rules for Life An Antidote to Chaos|Jordan B. Peterson|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1512705866l/30257963._SY75_.jpg|50729930]
[b:Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts|522525|Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me) Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts|Carol Tavris|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1328876733l/522525._SX50_.jpg|2171014] (particularly the section on police and interrogations)
[b:Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking|40102|Blink The Power of Thinking Without Thinking|Malcolm Gladwell|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1440763417l/40102._SX50_.jpg|1180927] (The section on police again, but the whole thing's good)
[b:Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed|18406408|Please Stop Helping Us How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed|Jason L. Riley|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1393447302l/18406408._SX50_.jpg|26041518] (he specifically adds his rebuttal to her book-- It's always interesting to read rebuttals)
[b:Marriage and Caste in America: Separate and Unequal Families in a Post-Marital Age|773464|Marriage and Caste in America Separate and Unequal Families in a Post-Marital Age|Kay S. Hymowitz|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1348633250l/773464._SY75_.jpg|759515](poverty)
[b:Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything|1202|Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything|Steven D. Levitt|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1550917827l/1202._SX50_.jpg|5397] (on the underside of Chicago drug rings-- Fascinating!)
[a:James Q. Wilson|10343|James Q. Wilson|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1365648204p2/10343.jpg] on crime and legal systems
[b:The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure|36556202|The Coddling of the American Mind How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure|Jonathan Haidt|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1513836885l/36556202._SY75_.jpg|58291173] (I think it connects... but perhaps it doesn't?)
[b:Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled--and More Miserable Than Ever Before|273520|Generation Me Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled--and More Miserable Than Ever Before|Jean M. Twenge|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1441425003l/273520._SY75_.jpg|533560] (same here. Maybe there isn't a connection?)

This list is likely to expand. I have others on hold(my blessings and cursings to the library system and my empty pocketbook) that will probably add to my ever-expanding personal life course list.

EDIT: Will be watching Washington State really closely next year. Curious to see what results.
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
Este libro desafía la idea de que con el inicio de la era Obama se haya proclamado el final del racismo y estemos en una nueva etapa de daltonismo social. La autora argumenta de forma persuasiva que la enorme disparidad racial en el castigo penal en Estados Unidos no es meramente el resultado de una acción neutral por parte del Estado. Para ella, el aumento del encarcelamiento masivo abre un nuevo frente en la lucha histórica por la justicia racial. No hemos terminado la casta racial en América; simplemente la hemos rediseñado. Apuntando una potente denuncia sobre la Guerra contra la Droga que está diezmando las comunidades de color, el sistema de justicia criminal estadounidense funciona como un sistema contemporáneo de control permanente.

El libro de Michelle Alexander arroja nuevas perspectivas sobre la profunda injusticia que se está produciendo hoy en EE.UU., planteando una pregunta básica: ¿Cómo ha sido el tratamiento a la comunidad negra a lo largo de toda su historia? Primero fue la Esclavitud, luego Jim Crow, la segregación, el terror del Ku Klux Klan, etc. Hoy es la brutalidad y el asesinato por parte de la policía, la criminalización al por mayor y el encarcelamiento en masa. Una vez más, la discriminación ha sido legalizada e institucionalizada.
  bibliotecayamaguchi | Sep 20, 2021 |
I can see why this book was getting so much love around June 2020 – it’s a strong argument against the “war on drugs” and incarceration because of the disproportionate it affect it has on Black men. As of now, it’s a bit of an older book, enough so that it warranted a lengthy introduction by Alexander in the 10th anniversary edition explaining the choice to focus of Black men and the way Obama’s presidency did not improve the overall situation as she explains it.

A lot of The New Jim Crow made me think, which is the best thing in non-fiction books, especially those centered around social justice. Despite my efforts at educating myself and being bettering humbles me in remembering that I have barely scratched the surface in discovering how deeply systematic racism defines the United States. Take Obama’s presidency for example – I agree with Alexander when she states that many people look at that and assume things are getting better. I come from a place of privilege to be able to even consider such things when a firm picture from a different perspective so clearly illustrates how prejudiced the system is.

Alexander presents her case with a strong voice and a surplus of evidence. In many ways, I felt she was simply lifting the veil to things that should be obvious. I found the conversation on “color blindness” particularly interesting as in the last few years we’ve learned how damaging that perspective can be.

The New Jim Crow is essential reading for anyone who is serious about their antiracism work. Full stop. This is an excellent book, extremely educational, well-written, and eye-opening. If you care about equity in the United States, this is a good place to learn about oppression as executed through the criminal justice system. ( )
  Morteana | Sep 16, 2021 |
Summer 2020 (May? June?);

It's been too long to do this review proper justice (though all the reviews today have been so light and scant as I try to catch up like twenty or thirty of them and get myself when I can start doing them weekly/biweekly again), but this book was incredibly stark, harrowing, and educational. There was so much I did not know about our legal system at all before reading this book, about the grey spaces, and the deviousness of cultural traps that I only barely new about facing the black community, and especially black boys/men.

I think everyone (especially every educator) should read this book. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
I'm honestly not 100% sure what to say in this review. Even ten years after its first publication, Michelle Alexander's book is extremely powerful and poignant. As I read the book, it continually made me think of how exactly I viewed the world around me. I've always seen myself as an open-minded person, and I always try to stand up for others when and where I can. The New Jim Crow really made me think about what exactly I wasn't seeing or noticing in the world around me. With all the unrest currently plaguing the US right now, this is definitely a must-read book for everyone. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
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Quoting Alexander: "I consider myself a prison abolitionist, in the sense that I think we will eventually end the prisons as we know them. That doesn’t mean that I don’t think we don’t need to remove people from the community who pose a serious threat or who cause serious harm for some period of time. But the question is do we want to create and maintain sites that are designed for the intentional infliction of needless suffering? Because that’s what prison is today. They are sites where we treat people as less than human and put them in literal cages and intentionally inflict harm and suffering on them and then expect that this will somehow improve them. It’s nonsensical, immoral, and counterproductive, and that is what I would like to see come to an end."
 
Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.
adicionada por 2wonderY | editarPublisher's Weekly
 

» Adicionar outros autores (7 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Alexander, MichelleAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Chilton, KarenNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
West, CornelPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Wikipédia em inglês (41)

American juvenile justice system

City of Los Angeles v. Lyons

Comparison of United States incarceration rate with other countries

Jim Crow laws

Michelle Alexander

Prison

United States presidential election in Idaho, 1984

United States presidential election in Illinois, 1984

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This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

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