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The Gospel According to Lost por Chris Seay
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The Gospel According to Lost (original 2009; edição 2009)

por Chris Seay

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596348,051 (3.13)3
"Chris Seay is one of my favorite people. He's a shepherd at heart. His insights on culture always take me into a better understanding of the world we live in. I'm grateful for him in so many ways." --Don Miller, author of Blue Like Jazz An epic journey into the deepest mysteries of faith Lost is not just a television show. It has become much larger than that, growing into a complex, mystery-filled epic that has garnered over twenty-three million participants. Some might call these people viewers, but you don't just watch Lost--you participate in it. It demands that you dialogue with the story, seeking theories, discussing with friends, and comparing yourself to the characters. Lost has broken all the formulas for television, and in doing so has drawn together millions of people on a shared journey that explores life, faith, history, science, philosophy, hope, and the basic questions of what it means to be human. It's the seemingly infinite ideas, philosophies, and biblical metaphors that draw us in and leave us wanting more. The Gospel According to Lost explores each of these elements in an analysis of faith and metaphor--a perfect resource for those who want to go even deeper into the journey. Inside, you'll discover what Lost has to say about The clash between faith and reas0n, on the island and in real life; The struggle with guilt that consumes each character--and sometimes us too; The dichotomy between fatalism and fate, and what the Bible advises; How being lost--on an island or in society--presents an opportunity for reinvention that liberates some and paralyzes others.… (mais)
Membro:soxfaninkc
Título:The Gospel According to Lost
Autores:Chris Seay
Informação:Thomas Nelson (2009), Paperback, 224 pages
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The Gospel According to Lost por Chris Seay (2009)

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"The Gospel According to Lost" is not normally a book I would blindly pick up. I am not a major fan of any of the "Gospel According to" books. To say that Chris Seay pleasantly surprised me would be and understatment. As an avid viewer of LOST, I generally enjoyed this spin on the show.

The book begins by explaining how LOST is different from other shows and why it has become an import influence to the people who watch it every week. After this introduction, each chapter examines a specific character by looking at the main philosophical theme they represent and how their character changes throughout the show in regard to their theme. He then compares the LOST narrative to stories found in the Bible.


I often found myself making the same connections that Seay did:


* Eko with his bible-stick of scripture
* Sawyer's bad-boy-seeking-redemption story
* Locke with his insistence on faith
* Shephard's stubborn anti-supernatural stance




On the negative side, Seay often took the easy road when reflecting on the characters--there are a lot of deeper connections that could have been plumbed. Also, the structure of the book was quite scattered. There was no unifying arc to the book as a whole. This book provides a great review of certain characters and mysteries the show has created, which is especially useful before the final season this spring.
( )
  chaoticbooklover | Dec 26, 2018 |
Being a fan of the TV show Lost, I couldn't help putting my hand up for a copy of Chris Seay's The Gospel According to Lost through ThomasNelson's Booksneeze program. This book looks at how life, faith, science, philosophy, hope and the basic questions of what it means to be human are explored in the TV show and relates them back to biblical stories and characters.If you have watched Lost you will know that there are always questions and as an answer for each question is found more questions result. I like what Chris has to say in the first chapter - "We were created from mystery to live in mystery - to trek an adventure of faith - but instead of embracing the process, we stir and squirm until we find an answer to anchor us, to make us feel safe." The book is a short easy read, broken down into chapters, most of them dealing with one character and the issues they face. I felt some of the parallels drawn were a bit of a stretch and some issues could have been delved into more deeply. Just as things started to get interesting the chapter would finish and he would move onto the next character. As a starting point for thinking and discussion though it is a great resource.Now I'm impatiently waiting for the last season of Lost to start over here and carefully avoiding any spoilers on the internet. ( )
  mels_71 | Jan 21, 2011 |
A few months back I was able to pick a book to review from some recent releases from Thomas Nelson. And there it was. My book. The book that was written just for me. The Gospel According to Lost by Chris Seay.

So of course it was my choice for the review and they shipped it to me. I just finished it and if you love the show or even if you just “put up with” the show, this is a great book. It helps you put together the pieces of the story and the characters better because this outlines each of them and helps you to understand their underlying motives, backgrounds and personalities.

But the book does more than just outline the characters, it helps put their role and the role of the island in a perspective parallel with salvation, God’s love, and how we make choices in this journey. I enjoyed the parallels and how the writer elaborates on grace and it’s manifestation in “Jacob’s” acceptance and encouragement of our beloved “Lost” characters regardless of their spicy backgrounds. And I won’t even tell you the “couple” he chooses from the story as the true example of “love”.

Chris Seay’s writing is well done as he portrays each character and points out their purpose or his observed purpose for them in the show. So be sure and check out the book and see if you agree, as we all wait to see just how our questions will be answered and exactly how this is all going to turn out for Jack, Kate, Sawyer, Sayid, Hurley, and all the others in the series finale.

Find yourself… keeping it real. ( )
  kitkat4real | Mar 5, 2010 |
To say that Lost is a phenomenon would be an understatement. Over the last 6 seasons, I've watched and listened as viewers have followed the trials of their favorite island castaways and with the final season just beginning, it seemed appropriate for me to review The Gospel According to Lost by Chris Seay.

As many viewers are aware, Lost is more than a story about a group of people who get stranded on an island, it's a multi~layered story that explores fate, reason, faith, guilt, salvation and a host of other philosophical and religious tenents. And it's within this framework that Seay seeks to explore the relationship between the television series and the Judeo~Christian beliefs in redemption and salvation. Although he acknowledges the show's exploration of other religious beliefs, his analysis is grounded in the teachings of Jesus Christ with reference to the Holy Bible.

One of the strongest points in Seay's analysis relate to the power of words and the belief that they can shape a person's future. As an example, Seay talks about the names of the characters and how their names influence their personalities. The writers, he believes, put a lot of thought into the naming of the characters much like Jewish parents put serious thought into the names of their children because they knew there was power (or failure) in a name.

Seay also examines the story of Hurley, who believes he is cursed. This curse, Seay writes, can be traced back to the casual utterance of Hurley's father: "Having hope is never stupid. You gotta believe good things will happen; then they will. In this world, son, you've gotta make your own luck." With those words, Hurley's father abandoned him, leaving a young boy (and, ultimately, a grown man) feeling "lost" and worthless. Therefore, the question arises, did Hurley allow his father's abandoment and fruitless words to bury him in hopelessness or could he have escaped the "curse" and made his own luck?

Whether you are a Christian or not, this book offers and interesting analysis of a television series that has offered so much to so many people. ( )
  curiouschild | Feb 28, 2010 |
As an avid fan of Lost, I was really excited to see the show related to my personal journey of faith. Any viewer of Lost can tell you that JJ Abrams and crew pack in a BAJILLION references to faith, Christianity, the Bible, philosophy, science, literature, music, and history, all while attempting to give valid reasons why the six-packed, sweaty men on the island might need to run around with their shirts off. It’s a lot for a girl to take in! And a lot of information for any author to tackle in a book such as this. Seay breaks down the characters of Lost and relates them to different elements of the Christian walk, including faith and reason, fate, salvation, unconditional love, brokenness, forgiveness, etc. Many of his comparisons were compelling, although some of the chapters were stronger than others. For example, viewers barely know anything about Jacob (while referenced throughout the series, he only really shows up in the last episode of the fifth season), so that chapter seemed full of conjecture. The chapter on Desmond and Penny, however, was extremely well done, comparing how Desmond and Penny sacrifice everything to be with each other in the end with how Christ passionately pursues us and would do anything for us to be with him.

Read my full review here: http://c2rcc.wordpress.com/2010/01/19/1-the-gospel-according-to-lost-by-chris-se... ( )
  letseatgrandpa | Feb 23, 2010 |
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"Chris Seay is one of my favorite people. He's a shepherd at heart. His insights on culture always take me into a better understanding of the world we live in. I'm grateful for him in so many ways." --Don Miller, author of Blue Like Jazz An epic journey into the deepest mysteries of faith Lost is not just a television show. It has become much larger than that, growing into a complex, mystery-filled epic that has garnered over twenty-three million participants. Some might call these people viewers, but you don't just watch Lost--you participate in it. It demands that you dialogue with the story, seeking theories, discussing with friends, and comparing yourself to the characters. Lost has broken all the formulas for television, and in doing so has drawn together millions of people on a shared journey that explores life, faith, history, science, philosophy, hope, and the basic questions of what it means to be human. It's the seemingly infinite ideas, philosophies, and biblical metaphors that draw us in and leave us wanting more. The Gospel According to Lost explores each of these elements in an analysis of faith and metaphor--a perfect resource for those who want to go even deeper into the journey. Inside, you'll discover what Lost has to say about The clash between faith and reas0n, on the island and in real life; The struggle with guilt that consumes each character--and sometimes us too; The dichotomy between fatalism and fate, and what the Bible advises; How being lost--on an island or in society--presents an opportunity for reinvention that liberates some and paralyzes others.

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