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Black Heart, Ivory Bones (2000)

por Ellen Datlow (Editor), Terri Windling (Editor)

Outros autores: Russell Blackford (Contribuidor), Scott Bradfield (Contribuidor), Michael Cadnum (Contribuidor), Debra Cash (Contribuidor), Susanna Clarke (Contribuidor)17 mais, Greg Costikyan (Contribuidor), Leah Cutter (Contribuidor), Ellen Datlow (Introdução), Charles de Lint (Contribuidor), Esther Friesner (Contribuidor), Neil Gaiman (Contribuidor), Hardesty. Emma (Contribuidor), Bryn Kanar (Contribuidor), Tanith Lee (Contribuidor), Joyce Carol Oates (Contribuidor), Severna Park (Contribuidor), Delia Sherman (Contribuidor), Brian Stableford (Contribuidor), Ellen Steiber (Contribuidor), Howard Waldrop (Contribuidor), Terri Windling (Introdução), Jane Yolen (Contribuidor)

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

Séries: The Snow White, Blood Red Series (6)

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614429,366 (3.98)22
Favorite fairy tales are updated and hauntingly reimagined by twenty of today's finest writers of fiction and fantasy Once upon a time, all our cherished dreams began with the words once upon a time. This is the phrase that opened our favorite tales of princes and spells and magical adventures. World Fantasy Award-winning editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling understand the power of beloved stories--and in Black Heart, Ivory Bones, their sixth anthology of reimagined fairy tales, they have gathered together stories and poetry from some of the most acclaimed writers of our time, including Neil Gaiman, Tanith Lee, Charles de Lint, and Joyce Carol Oates. But be forewarned: These fairy tales are not for children. A prideful Texas dancer is cursed by a pair of lustrous red boots . . . Goldilocks tells all about her brutal and wildly dysfunctional foster family, the Bears . . . An archaeologist in Victorian England is enchanted by a newly exhumed Sleeping Beauty . . . A prince of tabloid journalism is smitten by a trailer-park Rapunzel . . . A clockwork amusement park troll becomes sentient and sets out to foment an automaton revolution. These are but a few examples of the marvels that await within these pages--tales that range from the humorous to the sensuous to the haunting and horrifying, each one a treasure with a distinctly adult edge.… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porMizTati, ejmw, H74, AEnders, SusanCoffman, biblioteca privada, lynacare, JaimieRiella, ktlvaughan
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This might be my favourite of this series of compilations yet. The others were always good, but the issue was always a plethora of stories that I didn’t enjoy at all or skipped entirely. Not the case for this selection, as I read this book quite quickly and couldn’t wait to read story after story. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
A good collection of re-telling fairy tales, although they stick with the theme of the dark side of fairy tales. Not a lot of happy endings; the first story is a re-telling of "Rapunzel" and it is perhaps the lightest. And "The Cats of San Martino" was also a good tale of self-realization. "You, Little Match Girl" takes on the dark theme of Anderson that one would expect and it is in the modern time, and "And Still She Sleeps" is an intriguing re-telling of "Sleeping Beauty." I definitely could have done without the tragedy of "Bear It Away," though. Too many overtones in that story. So all-in-all, a good set of authors and re-tellings for a modern era. ( )
  threadnsong | Dec 29, 2018 |
This lovely book, Black Heart, Ivory Bones, is a collection of fantasy and horror tales edited by my two favorite ladies of their respective genres Ellen Datlow (horror) and Terri Windling (fantasy). This is one book in a series of six volumes of, as they call it, reconsidered fairy tales. These fairy tales are rewritten to change the focus of the originals or perhaps just to sharpen the point of them to showcase the sinister, the sensual, and the sometimes sadistic roots of our childhood fairy tales.

Some of my favorites were "Rapunzel", "Big Hair", "The King with Three Daughters", "And Still She Sleeps", "Goldilocks Tells All", "The Red Boots", "You, Little Match Girl", "The Cats of San Martino" and "The Golem". And, yes, one of those ("You, Little Match Girl") was by the infamous Joyce Carol Oates, whose work I normally find too harsh to stomach, this particular piece though was one of the most profoundly powerful in the collection. The other piece that was the best in my opinion was "And Still She Sleeps" which brings up the very valid point that if true love's kiss is supposed to wake someone, and the only people available to kiss them were people that had not known them to love them in life, how are they ever to be kissed awake? True love is not determined on beauty alone.

My husband does not enjoy re-written fairy tales so I thought I would bring up his complaint since I don't have any of my own to voice. He says that authors that write these sorts of stories just seem to take the characters in them and drop everything else to make them act out something completely different. I don't completely agree with him because, though some stories do that, such as Big Hair, at the same time they do keep to the spirit of what the original story was trying to say, even if in a more modern, dark or surreal way.

If you enjoy reconsidered fairy tales, short stories of a more modern bent that take your old fairy tales and give them new and interesting life, then I would say definitely give this book a whirl. You won't be disappointed.

Favorite Quote:
"It's my latest," Goldy concluded, "my best, and the one which the New York Times recently described as 'thrilling, sad, heartbreaking' and 'packs a huge wallop.' Entitled The Goldilocks Syndrome, it's currently available in the lobby at a today-only discount of $21.95. And if you act now, I'll sign and date this sucker at no extra charge."
--Goldilocks Tells All ( )
2 vote exlibrisbitsy | Mar 6, 2010 |
Sadly this is the last in the Adult Fairy Tale series of short stories collected by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windlin. It contains 21 tales and poems by 20 different authors. Below is a full list of the stories and a brief description of what they are about.

Rapunzel - Tanith Lee
A young Prince falls in love with a woman he meets on his way home after a battle. He spins his father a tale of Rapunzel to explain where he has been and why it took him so long to arrive home.

The Crone - Delia Sherman
A poem about the familiar figure of The Crone from many fairy tales.

Big Hair - Esther Friesner
A look at Rapunzel in relation to child Beauty Pagents. The end was quite chilling as her daughter follows in her footsteps and there is an illusion to child abuse.

The King with Three Daughters - Russell Blackford
A look at a troll killer based on the Norse tale The Three Princesses in the Blue Mountain. A strange tale about a warrior who has to "rescue" a King's three missing daughters where all is not what it seems.

Boys and Girls Together - Neil Gaiman
A poem covering a variety of fairy tales which looks at boys not wanting to be Princes (any other role is fine!) and girls secretly being Princesses. In their turn they become bad Kings and wicked step mothers, wood-cutters, ancient shepherds, crones and wise-women.

And Still She Sleeps - Greg Costikyan
A look at Sleeping Beauty after the authors marriage collapsed and suffered from depression. It also looks at the romantic notion of love when sleeping girl is dug up. Legends say only her true love can wake her up but it seems he isnot to be found as how can you truely someone from just looking at them, you have to know them first.

Snow in Summer - Jane Yolen
Snow White is better bale to look after herself in this tale by recognising her steo mother when she turns up on her doorstep one day. A bittersweet ending for our heroine.

Briar Rose and Witch - Debra Cash
Two poems with fairy tale themes. Not originally written as a pair but they go beautifully together.

Chanterelle - Brian Stableford
Part based on Hansel and Gretel with elements of the novella "Luscignole" and the play "the Sunken Bell" with illusions to the use of magic mushrooms along the way. Another strange and bittersweet tale.

Bear it Away - Michael Cadnum
A new look at Goldilocks and the Three BEars with talking bears that are chaed away by Goldilocks and a hunter.

Goldilocks Tells All - Scott Bradfield
The second Goldilocks tale in the series which sees Goldilocks cashing in on her tale and dishing the dirt in the media and in her novels of femal empowerment. It takes the stance that Goldilocks was never the innocent one in the tale...

My Life as a Bird - Charles de Lint
Set in Newford (de Lint's made up city) it contains elements of Rumpelstiltskin and The Fisherman and His Wife. Some familiar characters for those who are familiar with de Lint's tales with the addition of a grumpy dwarf.

The Red Boots - Leah Cutter
Based on the Hans Christian Andersen tale "The Red Shoes" the girl in this tale differs by never giving up her desire to outdo everyone else at dancing to the detriment of her personal relationships and love life. She suffers beatings and loses her best friend who she loves as more than a friend along the way.

Rosie's Dance - Emma Hardesty
Based on Cinderella after reading a poem from "Transformations" by Anne Sexton and looking at a painting by Terrin Windling. Filled with poverty and cruelty as one girl leaves behind her inherited family to make a life for herself. Contains many of the original elements of the tale despite the setting being very different from the original tale.

You, Little Match Girl - Joyce Carol Oates
Evoking the horror that happiness is but an illusion. The central character believes that if she loves no one she is free until her last close relative dies and she is in a car accident armed with just a fading flash light.

Dreaming Among Men - Bryn Kanar
A very odd tale where it turns out that the dreamer is an animal and not a human at all.

The Cats of San Martino - Ellen Steiber
Based on an Italian fairy tale found in Italo Calvino's collection. An interesting tale about a woman who runs away from her boyfriend after he cruelly dumps her for another woman he has been sleeping with behind her back. She finds solace in a house with no doors filled with cats that it turns out can talk. They lok after her until she is ready to return to the human world and carry on with her life. Unfortunately her ex-boyfriend is not so lucky...

The Golem - Severna Park
Looking at the parallel between the alienation of Jewish woman within their own culture with the alienation of the Jews in general. A older woman makes a golem to protect her and her friends from a group of men killing all of the Jews in the area. She is able to bring new life in the form of the golem, and in it's death, new life to an otherwise barren land.

Our Mortal Span - Howard Waldrop
A theme park named Story Book Town where one of the automations (a troll) breaks free and starts to smash up the others including Hans Christian Andersen, the Brothers Grimm and Perrault among other fairy tale characters. His issue is that the story tellers have lied to us and their dead ideas need to be overthrown.

Mr Simonelli or The Fairy Widower - Susanne Clarke
In a similar vein to Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell. It is a rendering of "The Midwife to the Fairies" found in English, Irish, Scotish and Breton variations. Many other fairy tale themes are used in this charming tale of a fairy, his servant and the man who tries to trick them to save the life of a mortal woman.

My personal favourite was The Cats of San Martino very closely followed by Mr Simonelli or The Fairy Widower, My Life as a Bird and The King with Three Daughters. Others that deserve an honourable mention are Big Hair, Boys and Girls Together, Snow in Summer, Briar Rose and Witch, Chanterelle, Goldilocks Tells All, The Red Boots, You Little Match Girl, The Golem and Our Mortal Span. I am really sad this series has ended and I look forward to re-visiting them in the future. I also look forward to reading more anthologies by both women, either together or singly and I higly recommend their collections. ( )
4 vote Rhinoa | Jun 6, 2008 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Datlow, EllenEditorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Windling, TerriEditorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Blackford, RussellContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bradfield, ScottContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cadnum, MichaelContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cash, DebraContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Clarke, SusannaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Costikyan, GregContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cutter, LeahContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Datlow, EllenIntroduçãoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
de Lint, CharlesContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Friesner, EstherContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Gaiman, NeilContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hardesty. EmmaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Kanar, BrynContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Lee, TanithContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Oates, Joyce CarolContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Park, SevernaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Sherman, DeliaContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Stableford, BrianContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Steiber, EllenContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Waldrop, HowardContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Windling, TerriIntroduçãoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Yolen, JaneContribuidorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Canty, ThomasArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Favorite fairy tales are updated and hauntingly reimagined by twenty of today's finest writers of fiction and fantasy Once upon a time, all our cherished dreams began with the words once upon a time. This is the phrase that opened our favorite tales of princes and spells and magical adventures. World Fantasy Award-winning editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling understand the power of beloved stories--and in Black Heart, Ivory Bones, their sixth anthology of reimagined fairy tales, they have gathered together stories and poetry from some of the most acclaimed writers of our time, including Neil Gaiman, Tanith Lee, Charles de Lint, and Joyce Carol Oates. But be forewarned: These fairy tales are not for children. A prideful Texas dancer is cursed by a pair of lustrous red boots . . . Goldilocks tells all about her brutal and wildly dysfunctional foster family, the Bears . . . An archaeologist in Victorian England is enchanted by a newly exhumed Sleeping Beauty . . . A prince of tabloid journalism is smitten by a trailer-park Rapunzel . . . A clockwork amusement park troll becomes sentient and sets out to foment an automaton revolution. These are but a few examples of the marvels that await within these pages--tales that range from the humorous to the sensuous to the haunting and horrifying, each one a treasure with a distinctly adult edge.

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