Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and…
A carregar...

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the… (original 2010; edição 2011)

por S. C. Gwynne (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,179905,241 (4.05)179
Describes the actions of both whites and Comanches during a 40-year war over territory, in a story that begins with the kidnapping of a white girl, who grew up to marry a Comanche chief and have a son, Quanah, who became a great warrior.
Membro:DavidWRoberts
Título:Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
Autores:S. C. Gwynne (Autor)
Informação:Scribner (2011), 371 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History por S. C. Gwynne (2010)

  1. 10
    The Comanche Empire por Pekka Hämäläinen (Muscogulus)
    Muscogulus: Gwynne's book captured all the hype, but Hämäläinen's book is the one that revolutionized the history of the Comanche people. It deserves more attention.
  2. 00
    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee por Dee Brown (Cecrow)
  3. 00
    Comanche Sundown por Jan Reid (SRPetty)
    SRPetty: These books cover similar territory but one is solidly researched fiction, the other solidly researched non-fiction. To read them together will enhance your experience of this troubled time in our history.
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 179 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 90 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is an informative nonfiction account of the clash between Texas settlers and the Comanches in the 1800s. I learned a lot about the Comanche way of life and why it was never going to mesh with the lifestyle of white settlers. In a nutshell, the Comanche were nomadic, following the buffalo herds and ranging over hundreds of miles, and the white settlers wanted to farm and graze cattle. Though the Comanches were skilled fighters and horsemen, they were vastly outnumbered by the American army and also didn't understand the end goal of Americans until it was too late.

The subtitle of the book highlights the life of Quanah Parker. Quanah was a mixed blood Comanche. His mother, Cynthia Ann Parker, was famous for being violently abducted by the Comanches from her family's Texas settlement. She was nine years old. She was adopted by the tribe (they often kept and assimilated girls her age, though killing anyone else they encountered, because they would be able to bear children later and they badly needed to grow their tribe). Cynthia Ann, by all accounts, fully adapted to the Comanche way of life. She married a Chief and Quanah was one of her sons. In her adulthood she was "rescued" and forced to reenter American life, to which she never readapted. Quanah's story in this book feels incomplete to me. Though he ended up being considered the last Comanche chief (even that is complicated to say because the Comanche were made of smaller bands that really had little to do with each other), little is known about his time as a Comanche before surrendering and moving to a reservation. At that point, he became famous and developed into a skilled negotiator for his people, though there was only so much he could do. I was more interested in his earlier life.

I was a little uncomfortable with the ways this author chose to describe the Comanche. He uses words like "primitive", "Stone Age", "irredeemably hostile", "remarkably simple". He also dwells often on how they never had any sort of agriculture - is that truly the mark of a civilized society? I guess his judgment is true in ways, and was used as a comparison to other contemporary American Indian tribes which might also be fair. But it still troubled me and I wondered if the author was really coming at this from a fair, unbiased angle.

I'll be curious as I read more by and about American Indians if my criticism of this aspect changes.

All in all, an interesting and engaging history.

(And now I see it was a Pulitzer and National Book Critics Circle finalist - maybe I'm being overly sensitive . . . )

Original publication date: 2011
Author’s nationality: American
Original language: English
Length: 388 pages
Rating: 3.5 stars
Format/where I acquired the book: kindle
Why I read this: topic of interest ( )
  japaul22 | Jan 31, 2021 |
Empire Of The Summer Moon is a truly engrossing book. It grabs you from the get go and pulls you into the history of the fierce Comanche Indians who waged war on any and all those who attempted to encroach on their lands. Be it neighboring Indian tribes, Spanish explorers, Mexicans, Texans, Union or Confederate soldiers, buffalo hunters, cattlemen, or settlers, the Comanche raided and killed to protect and increase their hold on the treeless prairies and rocky escarpments that stood in the way of westward expansion of the white man. These were the lands of the free roaming, seemingly endless herds of buffalo that could stretch from horizon to horizon. This is were the Comanches ruled the earth, living off the buffalo herds that provided everything the Comanches needed to survive. The book details the incursions by the white men, who in their never ending search for more land ran up against the Comanche with predictable results. Murder and mayhem resulted on both sides for many years. No quarter was given by either side. The book details the mayhem and deprivation from both sides. It may not be an easy read for many, as it pulls no punches in it’s detail. ( )
  Ronrose1 | Jan 10, 2021 |
It's very good, but I felt it was a little long and very graphic in its violence. ( )
  glenncvance | Aug 26, 2020 |
This book is about the conflict between American Settlers and the Army, and the most powerful Native tribe in America, the Comanches. Quanah Parker is the strongest war chief of his people and is a mix between white and native. His mother was a captured settler who lived with the Comanche tribe. The Comanches often harassed white settlers and resisted the Union army. The book goes into context of how Union General Randell Slidell Mackenzie fought and eventually disbanded the comanches after many bloody years of war. Quanah Parker was the reason the Comanches became the most powerful tribe in Naive American history and why it took settlers longer to domesticate Indian territories in Texas.
I really like this book and would recommend it to all history lovers. This book goes into deep detail about the most powerful Native American tribe in history. it also talks about how the tribe organized itself, conducted raids, and resisted the Union Army longer than any other tribe. I like how the book talks in 3rd person, but also has a historical point to it too. How the book switches off between main characters is also interesting. This book gave me insight on tensions in America between the native Americans and settlers. This was a great book, but kind of long. ( )
1 vote TCurless.ELA2 | Jan 12, 2020 |
Book club book. I got less than 10 minutes into the audio book and it was making me very, very angry. Up to that point at least, the book is the exact opposite of what I was expecting it to be. If any of my friends have already read this book, could you please send me a private message here or on Facebook or e-mail? I have a question before I decide whether to read more of this book. Thanks!
  CiaraCat | Jan 9, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 90 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Empire of the Summer Moon is a skillfully told, brutally truthful, history.

adicionada por doomjesse | editarDallas Morning News, Dale Walker (May 30, 2010)
 
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The desert wind would salt their ruins and there would be nothing, no ghost or scribe, to tell any pilgrim in his passing how it was that people had lived in this place and in this place had died.
--Cormac McCarthy
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Katie and Maisie
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Cavalrymen remember such moments: dust swirling behind the pack mules, regimental bugles shattering the air, horses snorting and riders' tack creaking through the ranks, their old company song rising on the wind: "Come home, John! . ..."
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
Describes the actions of both whites and Comanches during a 40-year war over territory, in a story that begins with the kidnapping of a white girl, who grew up to marry a Comanche chief and have a son, Quanah, who became a great warrior.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.05)
0.5
1 6
1.5 1
2 11
2.5 2
3 55
3.5 27
4 164
4.5 32
5 121

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 155,686,956 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível