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Discourses, Fragments, Handbook

por Epictetus

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'About things that are within our power and those that are not.' Epictetus's Discourses have been the most widely read and influential of all writings of Stoic philosophy, from antiquity onwards. They set out the core ethical principles of Stoicism in a form designed to help people put them into practice and to use them as a basis for leading a good human life. Epictetus was a teacher, and a freed slave, whosediscourses have a vivid informality, animated by anecdotes and dialogue. Forceful, direct, and challenging, their central message is that the basis of happiness is up to us, and that we all have the capacity, through sustainedreflection and hard work, of achieving this goal. They still speak eloquently to modern readers seeking meaning in their own lives. This is the only complete modern translation of the Discourses, together with the Handbook or manual of key themes, and surviving fragments. Robin Hard's accurate and accessible translation is accompanied by Christopher Gill's full introduction and comprehensive notes.… (mais)
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 Challenge: Loeb Classical Library: Epictetus thread ...14 não lido / 14Poquette, Novembro 2014

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I like this translation for readability. ( )
  bribri56 | Feb 2, 2024 |
Meh. Seneca discusses the same principles but in a much more straightforward style (and with fewer religious and conceptual detours). ( )
  marzagao | Jun 1, 2021 |
Today's entry in Ryan Holiday's The Daily Stoic reads: "There is hardly an idea in Stoic philosophy that wouldn't be immediately agreeable to a child". This is how I feel about Epictetus' The Discourses. It all seems like so much common sense once argued in the written word. The Discourses is a transcription of Epictetus' various lectures, recorded by his student, Arrian. Once, my lectures on political economy were transcribed for an entire semester for a hearing-impaired student, and I recall reading my spoken words with a sense of awe: how was it that I could speak such things but could not readily put these same ideas on paper? It is a powerful way to record ideas. The parallels between Epictetus' Stoicism and Christianity, especially the New Testament, are remarkable. Many of the key gospel sayings are apparent in Epictetus' work. This is not a new discovery - many have demonstrated the links between Stoicism and the Abrahamic religions, with Thomas Aquinas apparently quoting Epictetus in City of God - but some links remain confusing. For instance, Epictetus constantly refers to "god" (as opposed to "God"), but he is not always referring to Zeus (except were the name Zeus is used explicitly). The absence of the other Greek and Roman gods gives me the impression (managing one's "impressions" is a large part of Stoic philosophy) that Epictetus was a monotheist. I have discovered links between the Stoics and Ralph Waldo Emerson, but there is a difference that is worthy of further investigation, which requires a study of Kant. Epictetus' "god" is "immanent", meaning: "being within the limits of possible experience and knowledge". This contrasts with Emerson's "transcendent" God, where "transcendence" is defined in the Kantian sense as "being beyond the limits of of all possible experience and knowledge". I find the distinction between the Transcendentalists and the Stoics to be somewhat difficult to comprehend. For Emerson, God was in each of us individually, but what was in us was also part of a greater God that we all shared. If the Stoics' immanent god is wholly within our experience, as in, one's "acting in accordance with nature", or, to put it another way, one's "acting in accordance with god" - or otherwise suffering the consequences which include unhappiness, to the point where suicide, not through personal trauma, but for one's inability to act in accordance with nature, is a legitimate Stoic "opt out" action - but at the same time, being human necessarily means sharing fellowship in accordance with nature, then is this not Transcendentalist? Clearly, a thorough reading of Kant is required to comprehend this distinction. Yet Epictetus provides, for me, the most thorough understanding of Stoic philosophy. It is probably necessary to have a firm grasp on the ideas of Heraclitus, the works of Homer, and at least a working knowledge of Epicurus and the Cynics, but otherwise, The Discourses comes close to a practical religious handbook. I mean this in the sense that The Handbook (Enchiridion) is like an overview of Stoic thought, whereas The Discourses fills in the spiritual dimensions of the philosophy. I have often cringed when reading Atheistic and science-reifying comments about religion, but Epictetus does no such thing. It is apparent that faith and reason are not incompatible, and Nietzsche was right in that "God is dead and we killed Him". I have often met academic colleagues who will state that racism has no place in Academe, in that it has no basis in reason; yet applying the same argument to religion is a bridge too far. Epictetus makes it clear that faith and reason go hand in hand, in that first principles of Stoic philosophy require an understanding that acting in accordance with god (or God, does it matter?) requires faith in the existence of a god, which without would mean that philosophy is built on shifting sands, in that if God does not exist then there is no meaning to life. To be sure, to cling dogmatically to any one interpretation of the first-principle god would be to challenge the philosophy built upon it, but if one were seeking to apply faith and reason in one sitting, then The Discourses is the most comprehensible philosophy to do just that. And this, to me, makes The Discourses one of the most useful, insightful, and edifying books I have ever read. ( )
  madepercy | Nov 7, 2017 |
Writer Samuel Johnson once said that his "old friend, Mrs Carter could make a pudding as well as translate Epictetus... and work a handkerchief as well as compose a poem".
  SamuelJohnsonLibrary | Mar 15, 2008 |
Fascinating and personally sustaining Stoic philosophy. I am no subtle philosopher, so I do not pretend to be able to rank Epictetus or make fine distinctions. But I find him useful and enlightening when I get too wrapped up in my petty cares. ( )
  AlexTheHunn | Oct 5, 2007 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 8 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
De hedendaagse lezer wordt op den duur dan ook een beetje kregel van het mensbeeld dat hem wordt voorgeschoteld; het is het zijne niet en zal dat, in het licht van hedendaagse inzichten, ook wel nooit worden. Desondanks geloven de vertalers dat Epictetus’ werk onze tijd nog iets te bieden heeft. Ik betwijfel dat. Ondanks hun inspanningen blijft het moeizame lectuur, niet alleen door de vele herhalingen, maar ook door het prekerige karakter van sommige colleges. Epictetus is, als ik me niet vergis, voornamelijk nog van historische betekenis.
adicionada por Jozefus | editarVrij Nederland, Allard Schröder (Jun 18, 2011)
 
Andere ideeën van Epictetus zijn moeilijker te verkopen. Waarom zouden we geen enkele invloed kunnen hebben op ons eigen succes, op onze eigen gezondheid? Waarom zou het slecht zijn om ook daarnaar te streven, naast het streven naar een mooie ziel door rationeel nadenken, zoals Epictetus predikt?
adicionada por Jozefus | editarNRC Handelsblad, Ellen de Bruin (Jun 16, 2011)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (30 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Epictetusautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Hard, RobinTradutorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Boter, GerardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Brouwer, RobTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gill, ChristopherContribuidorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Long, GeorgeEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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'About things that are within our power and those that are not.' Epictetus's Discourses have been the most widely read and influential of all writings of Stoic philosophy, from antiquity onwards. They set out the core ethical principles of Stoicism in a form designed to help people put them into practice and to use them as a basis for leading a good human life. Epictetus was a teacher, and a freed slave, whosediscourses have a vivid informality, animated by anecdotes and dialogue. Forceful, direct, and challenging, their central message is that the basis of happiness is up to us, and that we all have the capacity, through sustainedreflection and hard work, of achieving this goal. They still speak eloquently to modern readers seeking meaning in their own lives. This is the only complete modern translation of the Discourses, together with the Handbook or manual of key themes, and surviving fragments. Robin Hard's accurate and accessible translation is accompanied by Christopher Gill's full introduction and comprehensive notes.

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