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Charlie Brooker (1) (1971–)

Autor(a) de Dawn of the Dumb: Dispatches from the Idiotic Frontline

Para outros autores com o nome Charlie Brooker, ver a página de desambiguação.

46+ Works 1,760 Membros 36 Críticas 6 Favorited

About the Author

Image credit: Wikipedia

Séries

Obras por Charlie Brooker

Screen Burn (2004) 423 exemplares
The Hell of It All (2009) 358 exemplares
TVGoHome (2001) 127 exemplares
I Can Make You Hate (2012) 116 exemplares
Inside Black Mirror (2018) 62 exemplares
Black Mirror: Season 1-2 and Special (2018) — Creator — 33 exemplares
Unnovations (2002) 28 exemplares
Black Mirror: Season 1 (2012) — Creator — 21 exemplares
Black Mirror: Season 2 — Creator — 12 exemplares
Black Mirror: Season 3 — Creator — 10 exemplares
White Christmas [2014 Black Mirror TV episode] (2014) — Screenwriter — 7 exemplares
Black Mirror: Season 4 — Creator — 7 exemplares
Black Mirror Volume 1: A Literary Season (2018) — Editor — 6 exemplares
Nathan Barley: Series 1 [DVD] (2005) 6 exemplares
Dead Set [2008 mini series] (2008) — Posfácio; Producer, algumas edições5 exemplares
Black Mirror: Bandersnatch [2018 film] (2018) — Screenwriter — 3 exemplares
Black Mirror: Season 5 — Creator — 2 exemplares
Crocodile [2017 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 2 exemplares
Arkangel [2017 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Black Museum [2017 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Hang the DJ [2017 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Joan Is Awful [2023 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
USS Callister [2017 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Mazey Day [2023 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Loch Henry [2023 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Beyond the Sea [2023 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
San Junipero [2016 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Men Against Fire [2016 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
The Waldo Moment [2013 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Shut Up and Dance [2016 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Playtest [2016 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Nosedive [2016 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Smithereens [2019 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Striking Vipers [2019 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Metalhead [2017 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Be Right Back [2013 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
White Bear [2013 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar
Black Mirror: Season 6 — Creator — 1 exemplar
Demon 79 [2023 Black Mirror TV episode] — Screenwriter — 1 exemplar

Associated Works

The Atheist's Guide to Christmas (2009) — Contribuidor — 356 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Membros

Críticas

This is a collection from 2008-2009 of articles Brooker wrote for The Guardian, a British newspaper and website.
Brooker has a very dry, sarcastic, very British humour that I absolutely love - he's definitely one of my favourite British comedians/personalities. If you don't appreciate sardonic mocking of current (at the time) events, media and celebrity, then his work isn't for you. I found myself constantly laughing out loud and I can't wait to read the rest of his books, as well as his weekly articles still featured in The Guardian.… (mais)
 
Assinalado
brittaniethekid | 9 outras críticas | Jul 7, 2022 |
A great TV series companion for fans of the show. It gives a peek behind the curtains, showing a piece of the creative process behind each episode. Maybe it's the nature of the interviews with creators, maybe the episodes themselves... but the book is very uneven. Some episodes provide a variety of trivia, unexpected depth of commentary, or intriguing inspirations; while others just go through the synopsis and present people being grateful to join the Black Mirror team.

The most interesting for me was to see how the stories evolved and how the initial script was shaped by every new person working on it (directors, designers, actors) or by the constraints (time, budget, available technology, weather...). Sometimes the concept did almost 180 turn, other times it just got bigger and bolder as each creator pushed the limits a little bit further.

It was a fun read and an opportunity to revisit each Black Mirror episode from seasons 1-4. Fans will enjoy it, haters gonna hate ;)
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
sperzdechly | Jul 20, 2021 |
The Hell of it All is a mildly edited collection of articles written by Charlie Brooker for the Guardian newspaper. Since it's just a continuation of his earlier collection Dawn of the Dumb I've decided to produce a mildly edited collection of articles of my own. By which I mean I'm just going to copy and paste my review of that other book and delete anything that doesn't apply.

--

When I left home to start University there were many things I missed. But the combined heartache of all these things was outweighed by the joy I felt at the realisation that no longer would my residence's newspaper of choice be The Sun.

The word newspaper in modern English often gets shortened to just ’paper. This appellation is particularly apt for The Sun since it is undeniably full of paper and just as undeniably devoid of news. Being free of the odious tabloid was liberating. No more would every science article I read start with the phrase “Boffins at the University of…”. No more would the day's biggest news event be commented on by Jo, 19, from Wolverhampton, who was happy to expose both her views on world events and her bosom.

Since I'm a limp-wristed bleeding-hearted hairy-toed liberal the first newspaper I bought for myself was The Guardian. And immediately I started buying it I was in love. Not with the paper itself, whose more liberal stances on every single news story were refreshing at first but soon gave me the impression that if it leaned any more to the left it would fall over. No, the object of my affection was the splenetic Charlie Brooker. His column was often the highlight of each Monday, a day filled with dragging myself through lectures wondering where the weekend had popped off to and when it would be back.

Long after I had a falling out with The Guardian (they compared Boris Johnson to Hitler; I expect Godwin's law to hold in Youtube comments, not in my broadsheet newspaper) and switched allegiances to a different newspaper I would still buy a copy of Monday's Guardian just to read through his often hilarious pieces. The theme was generally self-loathing, although not being a selfish sort of man Charlie Brooker would happily dish out his loathing to anyone or anything else that had irked him that week.

This collection is a combination of Brooker's Monday articles from the G2 supplement that are him just moaning for a page or two and his Screenburn articles that review the week's television. Reading these angry rants once a week usually left me eager for the following week's article, but like some TV shows I worried that reading them all in a row in this collection would rob them of their charm. Thus, despite it being eminently pick-up-able, I practised putting the book down a lot. The individual articles are all rather short, a couple of pages at most. This makes them perfect for filling in those annoying little two minute breaks we have a dozen times a day. A few reviews have called it perfect toilet-time reading, and it is, but I mostly read it while waiting for a bus, while waiting for my pasta to boil, while waiting for British Gas to stop holding me (as it were), and many other pauses in my day that wouldn't normally be long enough for any serious reading.

Serious reading is not what this book is about. Charlie Brooker in general isn't always a seething cauldron of discontent, and he can be touchingly poignant, as best seen in his tribute to Oliver Postgate. However, the articles in this collection are witty, acerbic rage through and through.

If you like Charlie Brooker and haven't memorised everything he's ever written then this collection is a great one to dip into. It passed the six-laugh test with flying laugh-flavoured colours and, from a social history perspective, gives a nice overview of the changes in television during the three year period it covers. Charlie Brooker isn't everyone's cup of tea, but if you like your tea with a splash of milk and a teaspoon of relentless pessimistic fury, then you might want to give him a sip.

*This review originally appeared in The Daily Goodreads in July 2012.
… (mais)
1 vote
Assinalado
imlee | 9 outras críticas | Jul 7, 2020 |
When I left home to start University there were many things I missed. But the combined heartache of all these things was outweighed by the joy I felt at the realisation that no longer would my residence's newspaper of choice be The Sun.

The word newspaper in modern English often gets shortened to just ’paper. This appellation is particularly apt for The Sun since it is undeniably full of paper and just as undeniably devoid of news. Being free of the odious tabloid was liberating. No more would every science article I read start with the phrase “Boffins at the University of…”. No more would the day's biggest news event be commented on by Jo, 19, from Wolverhampton, who was happy to expose both her views on world events and her bosom.

Since I'm a limp-wristed bleeding-hearted hairy-toed liberal the first newspaper I bought for myself was The Guardian. And immediately I started buying it I was in love. Not with the paper itself, whose more liberal stances on every single news story were refreshing at first but soon gave me the impression that if it leaned any more to the left it would fall over. No, the object of my affection was the splenetic Charlie Brooker. His column was often the highlight of each Monday, a day filled with dragging myself through lectures wondering where the weekend had popped off to and when it would be back.

Long after I had a falling out with The Guardian (they compared Boris Johnson to Hitler; I expect Godwin's law to hold in Youtube comments, not in my broadsheet newspaper) and switched allegiances to a different newspaper I would still buy a copy of Monday's Guardian just to read through his often hilarious pieces. The theme was generally self-loathing, although not being a selfish sort of man Charlie Brooker would happily dish out his loathing to anyone or anything else that had irked him that week.

This collection is a combination of Brooker's Monday articles from the G2 supplement that are him just moaning for a page or two and his Screenburn articles that review the week's television. Reading these angry rants once a week usually left me eager for the following week's article, but like some TV shows I worried that reading them all in a row in this collection would rob them of their charm. Thus, despite it being eminently pick-up-able, I practised putting the book down a lot. The individual articles are all rather short, a couple of pages at most. This makes them perfect for filling in those annoying little two minute breaks we have a dozen times a day. A few reviews have called it perfect toilet-time reading, and it is, but I mostly read it while waiting for my creaky old laptop to start up, while waiting for my flatmate to get ready to go out, while waiting in a coffee shop for my friend to arrive, while letting my dinner simmer for five minutes, and many other pauses in my day that wouldn't normally be long enough for any serious reading.

Serious reading is not what this book is about. Charlie Brooker is not a seething cauldron of discontent all the way through, and can be touchingly poignant, as best seen in his tribute to Oliver Postgate. The articles in this collection, though, are witty, acerbic rage through and through, with the arguable exception of the penultimate one—his report from Glastonbury. That's acerbic rage for only half the article.

If you like Charlie Brooker and haven't memorised everything he's ever written then this collection is a great one to dip into. It passed the six-laugh test with flying laugh-flavoured colours and, from a social history perspective, gives a nice overview of the changes in television during the three year period it covers. Charlie Brooker isn't everyone's cup of tea, but if you like your tea with a splash of milk and a teaspoon of relentless pessimistic fury, then you might want to give him a sip.
… (mais)
1 vote
Assinalado
imlee | 11 outras críticas | Jul 7, 2020 |

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Bisha K. Ali Screenwriter
Anne Sewitsky Director
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Sam Miller Director
Yann Demange Director
Seamus McGarvey Photographer
Alice Eve Actor
Joe Cole Actor
Sylvain Neuvel Contributor
Claire North Contributor
Cory Doctorow Contributor
Jon Hamm Actor
Ludi Lin Actor
Kate Mara Actor
Graham Linehan Foreword, Author
Jenny Klaus Illustrator
Olly Wiggins Photographer
Kelly Burlace Illustrator
Milo Waterfield Illustrator
Sid Peach Author
Tat Radcliffe Cinematographer
Riz Ahmed Actor
Angie Daniell Producer

Estatísticas

Obras
46
Also by
1
Membros
1,760
Popularidade
#14,624
Avaliação
3.9
Críticas
36
ISBN
28
Marcado como favorito
6

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