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Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster (1997)

por Jon Krakauer

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
14,067313413 (4.19)382
A history of Mount Everest expedition is intertwined with the disastrous expedition the author was a part of, during which five members were killed by a hurricane-strength blizzard. When Jon Krakauer reached the summit of Mt. Everest in the early afternoon of May 10, 1996, he hadn't slept in fifty-seven hours and was reeling from the brain-altering effects of oxygen depletion. As he turned to begin his long, dangerous descent from 29,028 feet, twenty other climbers were still pushing doggedly toward the top. No one had noticed that the sky had begun to fill with clouds. Six hours later and 3,000 feet lower, in 70-knot winds and blinding snow, Krakauer collapsed in his tent, freezing, hallucinating from exhaustion and hypoxia, but safe. The following morning he learned that six of his fellow climbers hadn't made it back to their camp and were in a desperate struggle for their lives. When the storm finally passed, five of them would be dead, and the sixth so horribly frostbitten that his right hand would have to be amputated. Krakauer examines what it is about Everest that has compelled so many people - including himself - to throw caution to the wind, ignore the concerns of loved ones, and willingly subject themselves to such risk, hardship, and expense. Written with emotional clarity and supported by his unimpeachable reporting, Krakauer's eye-witness account of what happened on the roof of the world is a singular achievement.… (mais)
  1. 71
    The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest por Anatoli Boukreev (marzipanz, oregonobsessionz, coclimber, bluepiano)
    marzipanz: It may seem like an obvious recommendation, but I would really urge everybody to read The Climb instead of or in addition to Into Thin Air. It really sheds a completely new light on some of what Krakauer writes, and - to me - seemed a far more convincing account of some of the events.… (mais)
    oregonobsessionz: While The Climb is not an easy read like Into Thin Air, it does provide a different perspective on the disaster, and answers some of Krakauer's criticisms of Boukreev's actions.
    bluepiano: I may be the only reader of Krakauer's book who thought Boukreev came across as a hero in it. The Climb is a heartening reminder that experience, intelligence, and calm can be the makings of heroism, and it's quite interesting as well.
  2. 60
    The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Men against the Sea por Sebastian Junger (kraaivrouw)
  3. 40
    Everest: The West Ridge por Thomas F. Hornbein (BookWallah)
    BookWallah: If you liked Into Thin Air, then you are ready for the mountaineering classic, Everest: The West Ridge. This sparse first person account of the other American team that came after Whitaker in 1963 and put up a route that has seldom been repeated.
  4. 40
    Left for Dead: My Journey Home from Everest por Beck Weathers (riverwillow)
  5. 40
    Touching the Void: The True Story of One Man's Miraculous Survival por Joe Simpson (VivienneR)
  6. 30
    K2 : Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous Mountain por Ed Viesturs (Grandeplease)
  7. 20
    Shadow Divers: The True Adventure of Two Americans Who Risked Everything to Solve One of the Last Mysteries of World War II por Robert Kurson (alaskabookworm)
    alaskabookworm: Couldn't put "Shadow Divers" down; one of my favorite nonfiction adventure books of all time.
  8. 20
    Blind Descent: the Quest to Discover the Deepest Place on Earth por James M. Tabor (PamFamilyLibrary)
    PamFamilyLibrary: Who would guess, but going down into the Super Caves is as dangerous as going up K2 or Everest.
  9. 20
    The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon por David Grann (g33kgrrl)
  10. 20
    Eiger Dreams: Ventures Among Men and Mountains por Jon Krakauer (fichtennadel, Sandydog1)
    Sandydog1: If you want some background on "what makes Krakauer tick", do check out his earlier stories.
  11. 20
    Into the Wild por Jon Krakauer (sturlington)
  12. 10
    The Kid Who Climbed Everest: The Incredible Story of a 23-Year-Old's Summit of Mt. Everest por Bear Grylls (FireandIce)
  13. 10
    The Long Walk: The True Story of a Trek to Freedom por Sławomir Rawicz (sombrio)
  14. 10
    Ultimate High: My Everest Odyssey por Göran Kropp (Navarone)
  15. 10
    The Other Side of Everest: Climbing the North Face Through the Killer Storm por Matt Dickinson (riverwillow)
  16. 10
    Dark Summit: The True Story of Everest's Most Controversial Season por Nick Heil (normandie_m)
    normandie_m: The events in this book re-opened discussion of the controversies surrounding the 1996 disaster. Heil examines similar themes, particularly the ethical dilemma of whether or not to offer assistance to/rescuing sick climbers when one's own health and supplies such as oxygen are depleted.… (mais)
  17. 10
    Dead Mountain: The Untold True Story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident por Donnie Eichar (sweetbug)
    sweetbug: Both stories of mountaineering adventures gone terribly, terribly wrong.
  18. 10
    Annapurna por Maurice Herzog (Sandydog1)
  19. 00
    Snowstruck: In the Grip of Avalanches por Jill Fredston (alaskabookworm)
  20. 00
    K2: Triumph and Tragedy por Jim Curran (Polaris-)

(ver todas as 26 recomendações)

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Inglês (303)  Espanhol (4)  Italiano (2)  Francês (1)  Português (Brasil) (1)  Alemão (1)  Todas as línguas (312)
Mostrando 1-5 de 312 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Breathtaking! Definitely a must read. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Apr 11, 2024 |
NF
  vorefamily | Feb 22, 2024 |
A real eye opener into tackling Everest. KIRKUS REVIEWAnd onto thin ice--Krakauer's (Into the Wild, 1995) hypnotic, rattling, firsthand account of a commercial expedition up Mt. Everest that went way wrong.In the spring of 1996, Krakauer took an assignment from Outside magazine to report on the burgeoning industry of commercially guided, high-altitude climbing. Many experienced alpinists were dismayed that the fabled 8,000-meter summits were simply "being sold to rich parvenues'' with neither climbing grace nor talent, but possessed of colossal egos. From childhood, Krakauer had wanted to climb Everest; he was an expert on rock and ice, although he had never sojourned at Himalayan altitudes. While it has become popular to consider climbing Everest a lark and the South Col approach little more than a yak route, Krakauer found the altitude a malicious force that turned his blood to sludge and his extremities to wood, that ate his brain cells. Much of the time he lived in a hypoxic stupor, despite the standard acclimatization he underwent. As he tells of his own struggles, he plaits his tale with stories of his climbing comrades, describes the often outrageous characters on other expeditions, and details the history of Everest exploration. The writing builds eerily, portentously to the summit day, fingering little glitches that were piling up, "a slow accrual, compounding imperceptibly, steadily toward critical mass,'' when a rogue storm overtook the climbers; typical by Everest standards, it was ferocious in the extreme. Time collapses as, minute-by-minute, Krakauer rivetingly and movingly chronicles what ensued, much of which is near agony to read. Unjustly, Krakauer holds himself culpable for aspects of the disaster, but this book will serve an important purpose if it gives even one person pause before tackling Everest.A brilliantly told story, and one that won't go begging when the year's literary honors are doled out.
  bentstoker | Jan 26, 2024 |
Jon Krakaur recounts the events leading up to one of the worst days in the history of climbers of Mt. Everest. He chronicles the characters in several different climbing teams in painstaking detail thus starting out by illustrating the divergent characters who, though they may not particularly like each other, will have to watch out for each other’s lives.

I was enthralled by the story but was left wondering why anyone would want to endeavor it. Ambitious people not used to losing or quitting may have just wanted bragging rights. They’ve tasted the exhilaration that mountain climbing can bestow, the feeling of completion from seeing the world from the top of a mountain peak, the peace and calm at lower levels. But on Everest you’re barely breathing.

What climbers may not have realized was they needed to develop a team mentality, to be able to trust fellow climbers to successfully manage risks as well as their equipment as well as to do so oneself. Teammates needed each other to be not just physically but also mentally ready. In this account, not everyone was ready and some were woefully unqualified. One guy came with new boots and didn’t know how to attach crampons, but even the experienced may have had skills which hadn’t been practiced lately.

The entire ordeal took several months. Climbers endured weeks of agony climbing up from base camp to each of the next two levels and down again, acclimating themselves to the lower air pressure and oxygen at higher altitudes. Then they got one shot to climb all the way to the summit. Some climbing days were as long as 17 hours in dangerous weather, high winds, temperatures well below zero, snow storms, unsanitary conditions, sparse food, heavy loads, limited oxygen tanks. Diminished brain capacity from thinner oxygen led to confusion, lethargy and other ailments. Some broke bones, became snow blind and got frostbite, infections from unsanitary conditions, hypothermia and more.

Pleasures were evident when pain was alleviated: Climbers’ hands froze but then they got warm, their feet got tired but then they rested, they suffocate but then you got oxygen, they were bone-tired and then slept And getting to the top was only half the job. They needed to plan on leaving in time to avoid being caught in bad weather or nighttime. Climbing down, the body works fulltime

People who run the climbing expedition companies are in business. And China, Tibet and Nepal from where climbers can start, all want the economic benefit and charge up to 60K. Sherpas receive a pittance compared to the expedition companies. But Sherpas are of the area and understand the climate. They should be acknowledged that they know what they’re talking about because they’ve grown up with that. But they’re pitted against each other for the coveted jobs, competing for the only way they can earn more money which also led them to bad decisions.

For such a long, slow nail-biter adventure story, I found it odd that the main passages describing emotions conjured by exploring and mountaineering were confined to quotes from past accounts included as chapter introductions. ( )
  dcvance | Dec 21, 2023 |
I've been wanting to read this ever since I became obsessed with extreme mountaineering survival and disaster stories. There's something about people willingly venturing into an environment so hostile to human life, and the ways that can go wrong, and the moral questions that come up in these extreme situations, that is utterly fascinating to me.

Jon Krakauer was present during the 1996 Everest disaster, when a storm engulfed climbers on the highest slopes of the mountain and several lives were lost. He seems to be quite honest in his account, the mistakes he made, and committed to giving his companions a fair hearing. He is frank that altitude sickness may have affected his memories, and his realisation that he may have been wrong about who he saw enter camp is haunting.

A great window into the world of extreme mountaineering, the psychology that drives summit fever, and how small decisions can so quickly turn to disaster in such an environment. ( )
  weemanda | Nov 2, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 312 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
An experienced climber himself, Mr. Krakauer gives us both a tactile appreciation of the dangerous allure of mountaineering and a compelling chronicle of the bad luck, bad judgment and doomed heroism that led to the deaths of his climbing companions.
 
it is impossible to finish this book unmoved and impossible to forget for a moment that its author would have given anything not to have to write it.
adicionada por mikeg2 | editarEntertainment Weekly, Mark Harris (May 2, 1997)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (11 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Krakauer, Jonautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Karl, AnitaMapsautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Perria, LidiaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rackliff, RandyIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Getting to the top of any given mountain was considered much less important than how one got there: prestige was earned by tackling the most unforgiving routes with minimal equipment, in the boldest style imaginable. John Krakauer
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A history of Mount Everest expedition is intertwined with the disastrous expedition the author was a part of, during which five members were killed by a hurricane-strength blizzard. When Jon Krakauer reached the summit of Mt. Everest in the early afternoon of May 10, 1996, he hadn't slept in fifty-seven hours and was reeling from the brain-altering effects of oxygen depletion. As he turned to begin his long, dangerous descent from 29,028 feet, twenty other climbers were still pushing doggedly toward the top. No one had noticed that the sky had begun to fill with clouds. Six hours later and 3,000 feet lower, in 70-knot winds and blinding snow, Krakauer collapsed in his tent, freezing, hallucinating from exhaustion and hypoxia, but safe. The following morning he learned that six of his fellow climbers hadn't made it back to their camp and were in a desperate struggle for their lives. When the storm finally passed, five of them would be dead, and the sixth so horribly frostbitten that his right hand would have to be amputated. Krakauer examines what it is about Everest that has compelled so many people - including himself - to throw caution to the wind, ignore the concerns of loved ones, and willingly subject themselves to such risk, hardship, and expense. Written with emotional clarity and supported by his unimpeachable reporting, Krakauer's eye-witness account of what happened on the roof of the world is a singular achievement.

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